• Coloring Health Policy

Obstetrics/Gynecology - Health Equity Books

Want to enhance your rotation experience? Here are some health equity books you should read while completing your OB/GYN rotation . This is a changing growing list, always check back for new books!


#healthequity #rotationsreadings #racism #BIPOC #medicalracism #ObstetricsGynecology

“An informed medical professional is one that questions and challenges the past, current, and future of medicine in order to better serve the communities they care for.” - Faith Crittenden, MD

In medicine we are required to rotate through different specialties what I have notice is the lack of health equity readings, here's a starter list of some health equity books to help enhance your experience .


Obstetrics/Gynecology


Reproductive Injustice: Racism, Pregnancy, and Premature Birth

Author: Dána-Ain Davis

Black women have higher rates of premature birth than other women in America. This cannot be simply explained by economic factors, with poorer women lacking resources or access to care. Even professional, middle-class black women are at a much higher risk of premature birth than low-income white women in the United States. Dána-Ain Davis looks into this phenomenon, placing racial differences in birth outcomes into a historical context, revealing that ideas about reproduction and race today have been influenced by the legacy of ideas which developed during the era of slavery.


Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization

Author: Khiara M. Bridges

Reproducing Race, an ethnography of pregnancy and birth at a large New York City public hospital, explores the role of race in the medical setting. Khiara M. Bridges investigates how race—commonly seen as biological in the medical world—is socially constructed among women dependent on the public healthcare system for prenatal care and childbirth. Bridges argues that race carries powerful material consequences for these women even when it is not explicitly named, showing how they are marginalized by the practices and assumptions of the clinic staff. Deftly weaving ethnographic evidence into broader discussions of Medicaid and racial disparities in infant and maternal mortality, Bridges shines new light on the politics of healthcare for the poor, demonstrating how the “medicalization” of social problems reproduces racial stereotypes and governs the bodies of poor women of color.



Medical Bondage: Race, Gender, and the Origins of American Gynecology

Author: Deirdre Cooper Owens

The accomplishments of pioneering doctors such as John Peter Mettauer, James Marion Sims, and Nathan Bozeman are well documented. It is also no secret that these nineteenth-century gynecologists performed experimental caesarean sections, ovariotomies, and obstetric fistula repairs primarily on poor and powerless women. Medical Bondage breaks new ground by exploring how and why physicians denied these women their full humanity yet valued them as “medical superbodies” highly suited for medical experimentation.









Just get on the Pill: Then Uneven Burden of Reproductive Politics

Author: Krystale E. Littlejohn

The average person concerned about becoming pregnant spends approximately thirty years trying to prevent conception. People largely do so alone using prescription birth control, a situation often taken for granted in the United States as natural and beneficial. In Just Get On the Pill, a keenly researched and incisive examination, Krystale Littlejohn investigates how birth control becomes a fundamentally unbalanced and gendered responsibility. She uncovers how parents, peers, partners, and providers draw on narratives of male and female birth control methods to socialize cisgender women into sex and ultimately into shouldering the burden for preventing pregnancy.

0 views0 comments